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GC American Democracy Project
Active Citizenship in the Curriculum

Frequently Asked Questions

Active Citizenship means building stronger, healthier, and safer communities. Active citizens who invest their personal time and energy in working for change come from every sector and field of study. They are citizen bankers, citizen scientists, and citizen educators to name just a few. Active citizens come from all backgrounds and experiences, but share a commitment to actively promoting the rights of all people, seeking just solutions to problems, and working with others to improve community life and culture.

Student Civic Learning Outcomes


1. Knowledge/ Comprehension
Recalls information, concepts, and theories that are essential to public deliberation, community engagement,  human rights, justice, and equality; internalizes this knowledge to create meaning.

2. Analysis
Practices critical thinking as a guide to beliefs and actions that lead to insuring community well-being, human rights and just societies.

3. Synthesis
Thinks creatively to generate effective strategies towards community well-being,  human rights, justice, and equality.

4. Planning/ Implementation   
Applies civic knowledge to build just and equitable societies and work for community improvement.

5. Communication   
Effectively communicates ideas and concepts in order to engage with others to achieve effective active citizenship

6. Leadership   
Inspires, facilitates, or collaborates with others to build community life and just societies.

7. Cultural competency   
Functions effectively in a pluralistic society.

8. Evaluation   
Assesses the value of civic engagement, service learning, and leadership education initiatives.

9. Grounding   
Considers ones own values, motivations, and passions when working to create change in society.

10. Responding   
Builds and maintains interpersonal relationships in order to achieve the goals of effective citizenry

11. Committing.  
Utilizes ones own personal value system towards insuring community well-being, human rights and the building of a just world.

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Active Citizenship in the GC Undergraduate Curriculum*


The GC American Democracy Project Civic Agency Initiative supports the historic public liberal arts university mission to help students grow as active public citizens and leaders through a variety of service learning, leadership development, and civic engagement instructional strategies. This effort is one of several projects involved in the Georgia College Civic Agency Initiative, a national ADP project involving twenty-one ADP universities focused on two goals 1) Incorporate civic learning across the curriculum and 2) Build on and establish effective university-community partnerships.

Faculty members are invited to identify specific courses that prepare students for active citizenship. Please use the following link. Active Citizenship in the GC Undergraduate Curriculum. For more information please read the FAQ page.

Active Citizenship means building stronger, healthier, and safer communities. Active citizens who invest their personal time and energy in working for change come from every sector and field of study. They are citizen bankers, citizen scientists, citizen educators to name just a few.

Civic Engagement has been defined as individual and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern.

Civic Skills involve writing, public speaking, deliberative dialogue, advocacy and other skills that are required to participate as active citizens.

Leadership is understood as the skills and process of social influence in which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task.

Service-Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

*These definitions draw on resources from the following organizations and web sites.

Jonathan M Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service
http://activecitizen.tufts.edu/?pid=1
The student civic learning outcomes in the left column are listed with the permission of Tuft University's Tisch College, Medford, Massachusetts.

Campus Compact
http://www.compact.org/

Acknowledgement
The Georgia College American Democracy Project acknowledges the collaborative support of the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service.

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