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BA Concentrating in Fiber Arts
Fine Arts Requirements
General Arts Requirements 
 
       The textile industry relies on artists and designers with creative vision and ability in the areas of weaving, textile and surface design, fashion and costume design. Fiber students at GCSU study through a range of experiences designed to develop their creative and practical skills and prepare them for professional careers in the arts. Graduates of the program go on to become artists and designers/makers of fiber art, textiles, fashion or costumes or to pursue a range of other fiber-related careers.                


Classes:
 
ARTS 2720. FIBER ARTS I. INTRODUCTION TO FIBER FORMS AND MATERIALS (2-6-3)
Prerequisite: ARTS 1200, 1000, 2800 or 2810. Students are introduced to fiber structures through a variety of processes, including loom weaving, basketry techniques, and mixed media compositions. By using conventional and non-conventional methods, the art of weaving will be explored by creating both two and three-dimensional forms. Through slide lectures, demonstrations, research, and critiques, students will gain a better understanding of "fiber" as fine art. Emphasis will be placed upon the development of skill and craft, personal direction, and concepts. Lab fee. This course is non-repeatable.

ARTS 3730. FIBER ARTS II. PAPER, BOOKS AND DIMENSIONAL FORMS (2-6-3)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2720. This course will introduce students to basic Western and Asian sheet forming and casting methods, while focusing primarily on the creation of sculptural forms. Students will also be introduced to coil basketry as well as exploring basic bookbinding, felt making and stitching techniques. A range of contemporary issues involving alternative media and new formats are explored through slide lectures and class discussions. Students will be encouraged to develop conceptual focus and individual direction. The students in this class will create a collaborative sculptural project. Lab Fee

ARTS 3740. FIBER ARTS III. WOVEN STRUCTURES AND ALTERNATIVE MEDIA (2-6-3)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2720. This course develops a woven vocabulary using multi-harness looms. Content is explored in the development of individual direction and relationship to the discussion of historical and contemporary textiles and other works of art. Students will be allowed to build on the concepts and techniques they developed in ARTS 2720 and ARTS 3730 by continuing to develop individual direction within the technical framework of the loom. Lab Fee.

ARTS 4750. FIBER ARTS IV. HAND RESIST PRINTING AND DYEING, SCREEN-PRINTING AND EMBELLISHMENT. (2-6-3)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2720. This course investigates the Japanese shibori and Indian plangi resist techniques of binding, stitching, shaping and dyeing cloth to produce intricate patterns, along with traditional Japanese and African paste-resist drawing and stenciling techniques. Cloth will be dyed in Indigo and with cold water dyes and printed and painted with dyes and inks to produce complex surfaces. Students will then learn traditional stitching, embroidery, beading and appliqu techniques, which they can use to alter and enrich the surfaces. Lab Fee.

ARTS 4760. FIBER ARTS V. INSTALLATION, MATERIAL AND CONTEXT. (2-6-3)
Prerequisite: ARTS 3730, 3740, and 4750. This course examines the transformation and definition of space through the use of materials including hard and soft, flexible, found and alternative and the meanings these materials invoke. The implications of inter-dependency, rearrangement, and responsiveness to time within an environment are considered. The concept of installation includes relationships of objects, environments, and site-specific works, and will examine a range of spaces: public/private, interior/exterior, urban/rural. Concepts are developed through research, material investigations, and developments of both two and three-dimensional explorations. Emphasis is placed on both collaborative and individual direction. Lab Fee
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