Election Integrity Symposium

Carl Vinson Endowed Chair Symposium Dr. Brandy Kennedy
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U.S. Capitol Dome

Join scholars, practitioners, and students in spotlighting key issues of the election administration system at the Election Integrity Symposium. WebEx seminars will be hosted March 31, at 1 p.m. regarding Efficiency, Security and Equity, and April 1, at 1 p.m. addressing Public Trust and Voter Efficacy.

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Wednesday, 31 March 2021, 1 p.m.

Efficiency, Security, and Equity

Panelists

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Charles Bullock

Charles Bullock

University of Georgia
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Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

Georgia College
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Stephen Pettigrew

Stephen Pettigrew

University of Pennsylvania
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Gennady Rudkevich

Gennady Rudkevich

Georgia College
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Stephen Fowler

Stephen Fowler

Georgia Public Broadcasting

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Thursday, 1 April 2021, 1 p.m.

Public Trust and Voter Efficacy

Panelists

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Gabe Sterling

Gabe Sterling

Office of the Secretary of State, State of Georgia
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Claire Sanders

Claire Sanders

Georgia College
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Stephen Fowler

Stephen Fowler

Georgia Public Broadcasting
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Andra Gillespie

Andra Gillespie

Emory University
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Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

Georgia College

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Brandy Kennedy, Ph.D.

This symposium on Election Integrity is chaired and led by Dr. Brandy Kennedy, Carl Vinson Endowed Chair and professor of political science and public administration, Georgia College. 

Carl Vinson Endowed Chair

Brandy Kennedy, Ph.D. is the Carl Vinson Endowed Chair and professor of political science and public administration in Georgia College's Department of Government & Sociology. 

Her teaching and research interests include representation, bureaucracy, and political behavior.  Her publications focus on representative bureaucracy which examines the link between demographic representation of historically underserved populations and improved service outcomes. Race and Representative Bureaucracy in American Policing (2018) by Kennedy, Butz, Lajevardi, and Nanes applies the theory of representative bureaucracy to issues of race and policing.  Their findings suggest police forces that are more demographically representative will have more positive outcomes across various measures such as fewer excessive force complaints. Her current work analyzes the influence of representation on teacher satisfaction and tenure.