Office of Inclusive Excellence

Parks Hall

february is black history month

Graphic of Black History Month

The story of Black History Month begins in 1915, half a century after the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the United States. That September, the Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson and the prominent minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by Black Americans and other peoples of African descent. 

Known today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures.

In the decades that followed, mayors of cities across the country began issuing yearly proclamations recognizing Negro History Week. By the late 1960s, thanks in part to the Civil Rights Movement and a growing awareness of Black identity, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month on many college campuses. 
 
President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”
 
Since 1976, every American president has designated February as Black History Month and endorsed a specific theme. The Black History Month 2024 theme, “African Americans and the Arts,” explores the key influence African Americans have had in the fields of "visual and performing arts, literature, fashion, folklore, language, film, music, architecture, culinary and other forms of cultural expression."

-Excerpt from history.com

dinner with 12 strangers

Twelve strangers enjoy dinner on the Atkinson Hall porch

The Office of Inclusive Excellence is pleased to announce the return of “Dinner With 12 Strangers”, a “building community” event at Georgia College & State University. During the fall and spring semesters, there will be two Dinners that will include a delicious meal, fun icebreakers, personal introductions, and an engaging conversation about how we can make GCSU a more welcoming community for all.  Twelve selected individuals from all areas of campus will be invited to be one of the twelve strangers who meet for dinner.  

If you are interested in being considered as one of our dinner guests this semester, please follow this link to complete and submit the following form. Dinner guests will be selected by the Office of Inclusive Excellence and notified at least a week before the dinner is scheduled. Thank you for participating in this exciting new community-building program.

Diversity Statement

Georgia College & State University recognizes that diversity and inclusion are essential to our core values of reason, respect, and responsibility. We strive to achieve diversity excellence in the composition of our community, our educational programs, university policies, research and scholarship, campus life, employment practices, extracurricular activities, and community outreach. We also believe that a welcoming and inclusive environment is critical to attaining the kind of campus climate that allows members of our community to succeed in their endeavors, to be respected as individuals, and to feel a sense of belonging at Georgia College, and we support educational programs designed to achieve this kind of inclusive excellence. Our overarching goal is for Georgia College to achieve preeminence as a model for excellence in diversity and inclusion for our state, region, and nation.

Mission Statement

The Office of Inclusive Excellence seeks to provide education that informs, to support a culture that values, and to build an infrastructure that sustains a diverse, inclusive, and welcoming community at Georgia College & State University.

Vision Statement

The Office of Inclusive Excellence envisions a college community that is knowledgeable of cultural issues impacting diversity and inclusion, committed to historical and the inherent value of diversity and inclusion, and actively engaged in practices that demonstrate that knowledge and commitment.

 

Announcements from OIE

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