Professional Licensure Disclosures

The School of Nursing (SON) at Georgia College offers an upper-division nursing degree major (BSN) that is built on a two-year core curriculum of Liberal Arts and Sciences. A nursing master’s degree (MSN) is offered with the following concentrations: Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwifery, and Nurse Educator.  Post master’s certificates are offered for all of the MSN concentrations.

The undergraduate nursing program is designed to satisfy the current educational requirements prescribed by the Georgia Board of Nursing. Upon successful completion of this program, the unlicensed graduate is eligible to apply for licensure as a registered professional nurse by examination. Approval for admission to the licensing examination and subsequent licensure of qualified applicants is granted by the Georgia Board of Nursing.

The undergraduate nursing program at Georgia College has full approval by the Georgia Board of Nursing (237 Coliseum Dr., Macon, GA 31217-3858; Phone: 478-207-2440).  

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing, ​master’s degree program in nursing, and Doctor of Nursing Practice program are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education , 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001, (202) 887-6791.  

The nursing program at Georgia College was previously accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing

The School of Nursing at Georgia College has determined that completion of the Nursing (Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, and Nurse Midwifery) MSN degree or Graduate Certificate prepares a student to take one of the following national certification exams: American Academy of Nurse Practitioners National Certification Board (AANPCB), American Nurses Credentialing Center Program (ANCC), American Midwifery Certification Board, or the National Certification Corporation (NCC) one of which is required to apply for state certification in all 50 states and U.S. protectorates. Each nursing board will also assess clinical hours and may require additional state specific courses.  For a list of the national licensing boards, see the American Association of Nurse Practitioner’s AANP Student Resources page.  For a list of the state professional licensing boards for nursing, see the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) member contact page.

It is each individual’s responsibility to understand, evaluate, and comply with all requirements relating to national certification exams for the state in which he or she intends to practice as requirements vary widely. 

As of July 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education implemented new regulations that professional nursing programs (RN and APRN) must adhere to which require the nursing program to provide you with the following:

  • a list of all states/jurisdictions where the institution's curriculum meets state educational requirements for professional licensure or certification,
  • a list of all states/jurisdictions where the institution's curriculum does not meet state educational requirements for professional licensure or certification, and
  • a list of all states/jurisdictions where the institution has not made a determination of whether the curriculum meets educational requirements.

Upon successful completion of the BSN program, a graduate will seek application for initial Registered Nurse (RN) licensure by examination.  For the MSN or Post-MSN Certificate APRN graduate, the process for seeking licensure as an APRN in the different states can be complex and often requires licensure as an RN then obtainment of the APRN licensure. Most states require national board examination.

This process varies for each state and U.S. territory. Contact information (link or address and phone number) is provided for each US state or territory below. Graduates requesting first time nursing licensure application must complete several steps. To begin the licensure application process, search the particular state board of nursing website for the application.

Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) increases access to care while maintaining public protection at the state level.  Under the NLC licensure agreements, RNs can practice in other NLC states, without having to obtain additional licenses.  Georgia is a member of the NLC.  If you have a GA Compact License and can pass other state requirements (background check, drug screen, etc.) then you can easily work as an RN in a state that is part of the NLC.  In many states, having a NLC License will allow you to apply for the state’s APRN license (be sure to check with the BON).

NLC States as of Aug. 2020 (.docx)