Visiting Scholars

Spring 2019:  Carolyn Barber

Dr. Carolyn Barber is the Ron and Carol Cope Professor of Music and Director of Bands at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  In addition to her musical training, Dr. Barber has developed significant interest and expertise in the creative process as it applies to teaching, learning, and the development of artistry. She has demonstrated and elaborated upon her work at venues including the Midwest Clinic, conferences of the College Band Directors National Association, American String Teachers Association, and the National Association for Music Education, state music educators conventions, district training workshops, and masterclass/rehearsal clinics nationwide.

Dr. Barber earned her Doctor of Music in Conducting at Northwestern University, and her Master’s and Bachelor’s in Horn Performance from Yale University and Northwestern respectively. She is recipient of multiple honors, grants, awards, and distinctions for musical and academic achievement. In addition, her writing has been published in the Journal of Band Research, and she is a regular contributor to the Teaching Music Through Performance in Band reference series. Dr. Barber remains active as a horn performer and maintains a robust schedule as a guest conductor throughout the United States and Canada. Her work on the podium includes a special focus on contemporary American wind literature and she has numerous commissions and premieres to her credit. 

Dr. Barber will give public presentations on various facets of music and creativity, with special emphasis on what she has called Flock Innovation, or the combination of the creative process with group dynamics.  She will teach an interdisciplinary course on creative practice and will, in collaboration with Georgia College students, coach young artists in area schools to develop their creative potential.  

 

Spring 2018: Yael Prizant 

Dr. Yael Prizant is a dramaturg, adapter/translator, scholar, and educator.  Before turning to the academy, she worked as a production dramaturg for theatre companies in Los Angeles, including Company of Angels and The Actor’s Gang. She has translated works by two Cuban playwrights, and adapted/produced famous plays for Langlab in South Bend, Indiana. Her book, Cuba Inside Out: Revolution and Contemporary Theatre, investigates the effects of revolution and globalization on personal identity.  It includes close readings of seven Cuban and Cuban-American plays, as well as extensive research on modern Cuba. In 2012, Yael founded Ultreia, Inc. a non-profit arts organization providing resources for artistic expression. From 2008–2014, she taught in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre at the University of Notre Dame.  She earned her Ph.D. in Theatre from UCLA, her M.F.A. in Theatre (Dramaturgy) from UMASS Amherst, and her BA in Dramatic Art from UCSB.  She currently teaches academic writing at Johns Hopkins SAIS Bologna (Italy), works as a translator and editor, and gives private yoga lessons.

Dr. Prizant’s residency will include several public presentations and workshops on diverse topics such as American musical theatre, theatre and science, and translation and adaptation for the stage and screen.  Dr. Prizant will teach an academic seminar, “Cuba: An Artistic Exploration” THEA 4950 T/R 11-12:15, and devise an original student performance using a dramatic form known as Living Newspaper.

During her time here, she will also host free public lectures and performances:

Feb. 12, 2018 at 7 p.m.: “How to Watch an American Musical”
March 7, 2018 at 7 p.m.: “Science On Stage” 
April 10-12, 2018 at 7:30 p.m.: “Devised Living Newspaper Theatre Project” 
April 18, 2018 from 3:30-5:30 p.m.: “Adapting and Translating for Film and Theatre”

Spring 2017: Dr. Eduardo Mercado III

                  

Dr. Mercado is a Professor of Psychology at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, with expertise in the cognitive neuroscience of learning, memory, and perception. 

A native of Milledgeville, he earned degrees in computer science and electrical engineering from Georgia College and Georgia Tech, before pursuing a Ph.D. in human and animal cognition at the University of Hawaii. There he studied the conceptual abilities of language-trained dolphins as well as the acoustical skills of humpback whales.

 As a postdoctoral researcher, Dr. Mercado turned his attention to computational neuroscience and studies of brain plasticity.

 Dr. Mercado’s current research on neural and cognitive plasticity has been funded by both the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, and described in more than 50 peer-reviewed articles. In 2009, he was named a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. 

Mercado coauthored an innovative undergraduate textbook—Learning and Memory: From Brain to Behavior (currently in its 3rd edition)—that was the first to integrate findings from experimental psychology, behavioral neuroscience, and clinical neuropsychology, as well as the first to fully integrate findings from humans and non-humans. 

Dr. Mercado will give public presentations on his research with whales and dolphins, as well as recent breakthroughs in understanding learning in children with autism and the potential of the human brain to be rewired through training. He will also be leading a community-based search for the smartest dog in Milledgeville.

Spring 2016: Dr. Michael Charles Tobias

Distinguished scholar, Dr. Michael Charles Tobias, earned his Ph.D. in the History of Consciousness at the University of California-Santa Cruz, specializing in global ecological ethics and the interdisciplinary humanities. He is an ethologist/anthrozoologist and historian of ideas, focusing upon humanity’s relationship to the natural world, in both historic and contemporary cultures.

His wide-ranging work embraces art, comparative literature and spirituality, the history of ideas, philosophy, bio-ethics and natural history in the context of a multitude of possible future scientific, geo-political, economic and social scientific scenarios. He is the author of over 50 books and has written, directed and/or produced over 100 films. His works have been read, translated and broadcast throughout the world. He has conducted field research in over 80 countries.

Tobias has been on the faculties of such colleges and universities as Dartmouth, the University of California-Santa Barbara, and the University of New Mexico-Albuquerque. For 16 years Dr. Tobias has been President of an international ecological NGO, Dancing Star Foundation, focused on global  biodiversity conservation, animal protection and environmental education. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Courage of Conscience Prize. Tobias is an Honorary Member of the Club of Budapest.

Dr. Tobias’ most recent book, Hope on Earth: A Conversation, came out for Earth Day 2014 from the University of Chicago Press (with Dr. Paul R. Ehrlich), and his next book Why Life Matters: Fifty Ecosystems of the Heart and Mind, co-authored with his wife Jane Gray Morrison, will be published in the autumn of 2014 by Springer/Switzerland.
 
In accepting the residency, Dr. Tobias noted, “I am extremely honored to have been selected for this wonderful residency, and look forward to collaborating with the students, faculty and community on a wide range of humble projects, discussions, pro-seminars, events, endeavors and important initiatives.

Spring 2015: Professor Mab Segrest

Professor Segrest was Fuller-Maathai Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Connecticut College from 2002-2014. She has published articles on Central State Hospital’s history and is working on a book-length study.

In 2004 Segrest was a Mellon Distinguished Professor at the Center for Research on Women/Tulane, and in 2009-2010, a Fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for Civil Rights at Emory. Her 1994 book "Memoir of a Race Traitor" was named Editor's Choice/Lambda Literary Awards, Outstanding Book on Human Rights in North America by the Gustavus Myers Center on Human Rights and nominee for Non-Fiction Book of the Year by the Southern Regional Council.

Her work on Georgia’s state mental hospital is the culmination of three decades of political and intellectual work on the nexus of identity, culture and power in the U.S. South. Segrest explained, “I am thrilled to be able to bring my work back to Milledgeville and to teach and learn with GC students, professors and Milledgeville residents on this institution that has been so central to the city’s history. I think this course will be amazing!”

Leon Johnson is an educator and convergent media artist. His work includes painting, sculpture, installation, performance, food events, print media, video, photography, bookmaking and curatorial practices.  For more information on Johnson’s work, visit leonjohnson.org.

While in residency, he taught a seminar for Georgia College students titled “Taken Aback.” In addition to binding a field-dossier, as Johnson described it, the seminar included “walking and investigating mysteries and histories of the city and inventing maps that chart memory and place… field research across our town, the study of ecological patches, relearning tools, philosophical readings and discussions, community meals, as well as printing and binding our investigations into a final group publication.”  Iain Kerr, professor in the Intermedia program at Maine University and the founder of Spurse, an interdisciplinary collective of architects, biologists and artists, hosted a guest lecture as part of Johnson’s seminar. He also led students on a foraging excursion in support of a field-to-table-dinner in early March.

Blackbridge Hall Gallery featured an exhibition of Johnson’s work and ideas, curated by art major Emily Strickland in completion of her Museum Studies senior capstone.  The gallery housed Johnson’s Open Studio throughout his visit and served as a primary base of creative operations.  At Johnson’s invitation, Jonathan Kung, who runs the food blog and pop up kitchen Kung Food in Detroit, visited campus, held a lecture and hosted a one-night-only pop up restaurant. Kung’s last event was a dinner at Andalusia.

Johnson hosted three open presentations coinciding with the First Friday events in downtown Milledgeville for campus and the Milledgeville community.

Johnson’s partner Megan O’Connell also brought her talents to Georgia College. O’Connell and Johnson run Salt & Cedar letterpress studio in Detroit. O'Connell joined Johnson for the second public presentation and visited classrooms across campus.  O’Connell worked in collaboration with printer and department chair Bill Fisher to produce a limited edition serigraph, commissioned by artist Alison Knowles of a letter written by colleague John Cale.  Johnson’s son, Leander, and Fisher also collaborated on a fine art print edition invited into the portfolio exchange, “Snakes, Swine and Cocks,” curated by Brian Kelly of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.  This work and others by Johnson are now housed in the GC Permanent Collection.

Caitlin O’Connell-Rodwell joined the Georgia College faculty in spring semester 2013 as the inaugural Martha Daniel Newell Visiting Scholar.

O’Connell-Rodwell is a faculty member of Stanford University’s School of Medicine and a world-renowned expert on elephants.

Over the last 20 years, she has dedicated her research to studying elephant communication and how their societies are constructed and maintained.

O’Connell-Rodwell’s research has been published in more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and popular magazines including Smithsonian, The Writer and Africa Geographic.

She is also the author of the internationally acclaimed nonfiction science memoir, The Elephant’s Secret Sense and has published An Elephant’s Life, which is a photo book.

O’Connell-Rodwell co-founded and is the CEO of Utopia Scientific, a nonprofit organization dedicated to research and science education.

Her other interests include ecology, health, women’s issues and art.